The Eagle has landed - birds getting their prey

Thursday, March 23, 2017
eagle catching a fish
Splash and dash

Pictures of Eagles capturing their prey


Eagles are large birds of prey which are members of the bird family Accipitridae, and belong to several genera which are not necessarily closely related to each other. Most of the more than 60 species occur in Eurasia and Africa.

Outside this area, just two species (the Bald and Golden Eagles) can be found in the USA and Canada, nine more in Central and South America, and three in Australia.

Eagles are differentiated from many other birds of prey mainly by their larger size, more powerful build, and heavier head and beak. Even the smallest eagles, like the Booted Eagle (which is comparable in size to a Common Buzzard or Red-tailed Hawk), have relatively longer and more evenly broad wings, and more direct, faster flight. Most eagles are larger than any other raptors apart from the vultures.

Species named as eagles can range in size from the South Nicobar Serpent-eagle, at 500 grams (1.1 pounds) and 40 cm (16 in), to the 6.7-kg Steller's Sea Eagle and the 100 cm (39 in) Philippine Eagle.

Eagles are the predators of the sky, swooping down from above to take their prey:

eagle attacks a seagull

Eagle feasting on a seagull...
Like all strong birds of prey, eagles have very large powerful hooked beaks for tearing the flesh from their prey, strong muscular legs, and powerful talons.

They also have extremely keen eyesight which enables them to spot potential prey from a very long distance above.

This keen eyesight is primarily contributed by their extremely large pupils which ensure minimal diffraction (scattering) of the incoming light.

Hence the expression, "eagle eyed".


Is this prey a rabbit? Either way it shows you how fast an Eagle can swoop down and catch a prey that is bigger in mass with four legs! Run Rabbit Run!

eagle eating the guts out of a rabbit
Run rabbit run!
A rabbit you say?

Heck, my blind grandmother could catch one of those. Ok then, jackass, how about a fox?

You ever seen an eagle catch a cunning fox? You have now:

eagle catching a FOX
What did the fox say?

Want more? Check out these hungry tigers or this killer whale breaking pseudo orca's back... I doubt eagles use pH meters, bit if they did, I'd recommend they check out the Milwaukee ph tester. It's good for all kinds of applications such as testing wort and water.

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